8 Energy Savings Tips for Your Home

8 Energy Savings Tips for Your Home

Are you saving the most money possible on your utility bills?  Going green in your home and save money while using less energy.

 

1.    Utilize your blinds.  Closed blinds on hot days keep out extra heat that would cause your A/C to run longer to keep your home cooler.

2.    Cook a little differently.  Using convection and/or microwave ovens save up to 80% energy than conventional ovens.
*When using a conventional oven, place food on the top rack to cook food faster.

3.    Wash clothes in cold water.  Washing laundry in a cold water cycle can save up to $63 a year and saves 90% of the energy used to clean your whites, lights, and darks.

4.    Clean your filters and/or change them regularly.  A dirty furnace or A/C filter will slow down airflow and make it harder to keep your home warm or cool.

5.    Change your light bulbs.  Energy efficient light bulbs can save up to 80% of the energy used to light your home per year. 

6.    Unplug the electronics.  Small devices that are off, but plugged in such as:  laptops, kitchen appliances, lamps, and fans when not in use still consume energy while idle.

7.    Set your thermostat strategically.  The less drastic the temperature difference between the outdoors and your home can save you 6-18% on your A/C or heating bill.  Using ceiling and standing fans can help a room from feeling uncomfortable with this change and won’t use as much energy.

8.    Seal your home properly.  Eliminating cracks and crevices that air can escape is one of the most cost-effective way to make a home more energy-efficient and comfortable.  Make sure areas such as baseboards, window frames, attic hatches, and fireplace dampers are sealed or insulated to proper standards.

 

What are some energy efficient tricks you use in your home?  Tell us in the comment section below!

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